Ramadan sideburns

The month of Ramadan is an opportunity to strengthen family ties

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    Back in the days of the good people, we carried the words of our fathers and grandfathers through which we could recall memories and features of life in the Emirates in the pre-oil era, such as the customs and traditions that prevailed in society, the daily interactions between people, and how they celebrated the Holy Month in a spiritual atmosphere dominated by friendliness, compassion and cooperation.

    From year to year, people wait for the blessed month of Ramadan to enjoy its spiritual notes and its rituals that strengthen social and human ties between them, thanks to family gatherings and daily meetings that bring together old and young in an atmosphere of affection and happiness, and consecrate authentic values, customs and traditions in the souls of new generations.

    The father, Ahmed Issa Al Ali (Bu Khalifa), told “Emirates Today” that family gatherings in Ramadan are among the most important memories that are associated in people’s minds with this holy month, thanks to the customs and traditions that distinguish it, which adults are keen to implant in children, because it enhances togetherness. And interconnectedness, preserving the relationship between families and families.

    He added: “From noon, the women were preparing breakfast food and household chores, and with the time of sunset, the men would gather in the mosque or in the square to eat together. They would initially break their fast with dates, and often eat three dates with water or milk, then they would get up.” For the Maghrib prayer, after that they eat breakfast, so that each person brings a type of food, and it is placed on a large sarod (which is a tablecloth made of wicker), and thus everyone shares the food.”

    Al Ali explained that there were certain foods that were at the forefront of the breakfast table, and were considered among its basics, such as harees and farid (porridge), along with other items such as bread (rice) and fish, and sweets were also prepared such as harees mahalabiya made from sheep’s milk and ground rice. Some homes still make it, and they call it traditional khabis, balaleet, and custard, and they call it arrowroot. Jelly and modern sweets were not known at that time.

    He pointed out that the families were gathering again to eat the Ghabga meal, which is served at midnight between breakfast and suhoor, during which family members or men might gather in the mosque or neighborhood to eat it together. Bou Khalifa pointed out that after the end of Tarawih prayers, men would go out to visit to strengthen ties of kinship and ask about family, neighbors, and friends and communicate with them. This is something that is no longer what it was in those days after technology became an alternative to visits and people began to rely on mobile phones and social media to communicate. Among them and knowing their news, and perhaps the month of Ramadan is the most important opportunity to restore these traditions and return to gatherings among family, friends and family.

    Ahmed Al Ali:

    . After the end of Tarawih prayers, men would go out to visit each other to strengthen family ties and ask about family, neighbors, and friends.

    . At sunset, men would gather in the mosque or in the square to eat together.

    . There are certain foods that were at the forefront of the breakfast table and were considered among its basics, such as harees and porridge.